Triumph Speed Triple Forums banner

1 - 20 of 28 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
174 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've searched around and haven't found this topic discussed yet, so I thought I'd start the conversation myself. I've tried lubricating the slide pins on the brake caliper with different things, and wondering if anyone had any insight/experience/wisdom to share. I'm assuming that someone has probably done an experiment already, and if not maybe I will in the interest of science.

I've used: Nothing, Copper anti seize lubricant, Bel-Ray waterproof grease, Bendix ceramic high-performance synthetic brake lubricant, and KY "His & Hers" tingling anal lubricant. I haven't really been able to discern a difference so far. I always apply a thin film and only apply it to the guide pin surface, not the the threads. I'm only talking about the guide pins that go through the holes in the brake pads, not the slide pins that allow the caliper to float in and out.

What do you use? What do you avoid using?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
631 Posts
If the pins are not lubricated, upon braking, would the bike make a loud zing/buzz noise? When I changed my stock pads out for these DP HH+ sintered pads is when that noise started. It also squeals sometimes, like bus wheels that squeal. Sometimes it sounds like it reverberates up the brake line and into the master cylinder itself. So I'm a bit wary as to say what exactly is making the noise. Do you think applying brake grease would make the noise stop?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,398 Posts
Triumph recommends the copper based lube. That being said, mine doesn't have anything on them and they are fine.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,125 Posts
like you said. wether you use nothing or a blend of 100 different lubes, as long as there's no rust or corrosion (or worn out grooves) and the pads can slide freely, you should be fine and probably won't notice a difference. At the shop we usually wire wheel them clean and install dry.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
583 Posts
Do you dpelt? Here in the rust belt we are forced to install some sort of lube, especially with a pad riding pin. Shit will seize up before it leaves the lot.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,125 Posts
Do you dpelt? Here in the rust belt we are forced to install some sort of lube, especially with a pad riding pin. Shit will seize up before it leaves the lot.
the only time i really use lube is if there's already grooves worn in the pin and the customer refuses to replace them, or needs the bike back. I'll wire wheel it and use a very thin layer of blue ray waterproof grease.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
583 Posts
the only time i really use lube is if there's already grooves worn in the pin and the customer refuses to replace them, or needs the bike back. I'll wire wheel it and use a very thin layer of blue ray waterproof grease.
I have a hard time not lubing anything honestly. Only because I see the corrosion on a daily basis.

Granted I work with cars not bikes
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,313 Posts
I have used high temp rubber grease for years on calliper assemblies.
i would probably use copper anti seize for the pad pins but I don't know if it helps against corrosion.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12,395 Posts
lube the pins and put a thin layer on the backing plates of the pads as well. Also ensure the rotor buttons are clean and lubed..

you WILL notice a difference
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
583 Posts
I agree with joe. By rotor buttons I believe he means the fasteners?

The ceramic solids are put in to withstand extreme pressure and temperatures. In addition to corrosion protection. So in theory yes. But like I said I've seen it turn to tar over time
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,248 Posts
Rotor buttons.
S_0000103_000078-640x480.jpg

F41503652.jpg
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
174 Posts
Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Holy cow, I never even thought of lubing those. I assume one removes the circlip to get lube in there?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,621 Posts
Rotor button is awfully close to the braking surface, and the disc is on the outside when the centrifugal forces are at play. Lube does not sound good to me, having it migrate the few cm outboard will multiply your stopping distance at the most inconvenient moment. Clean and rotate is enough for me.

The circlip buttons pictured are prolly aftermarket, I'm pretty sure the OEM buttons are just giant rivets, pressed in for lifetime of the disc. I'm too lazy to go to the garage to doublecheck.
 
1 - 20 of 28 Posts
Top