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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
???

ok, so im cruising the web classified and i see 2002 daytona's with and without them.

im confused

???
 

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Some have them, some don't.
Kuhlka, RaceComp, or Decosse can likely tell you the differences. Not me.
 
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
thanks, i just find it kind of odd to build 2 different swing arms for the same bike. seems like a waste of R & D, and money overall.
 
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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
They went to a DSSA for one year to save weight/chase ultimate performance but I think the back lash about the cosmetic side was bad enough for them to go back to the SSSA. Good move in my opinion.
 

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Righty right. I think the only SSSA Daytona 955i for 2002 was the Centenary Edition (dark british racing green). The rest were that ugly black powdercoat DSSA.
 

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SSSA needs to be heavier to reach the same strengt as DSSA reaches at lower weight. Also SSSA is also more expensive to build.

One guy I know asked me about triumhp that is that swing arm strong and how can it hold up like that. as the wheel is Only mounted from one side .

I told him that every car wheel in the world is mounted single sided and they hold up well. damn I got him :eek:wned:

JakeT.
 

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Jaket said:
SSSA needs to be heavier to reach the same strengt as DSSA reaches at lower weight. Also SSSA is also more expensive to build.

One guy I know asked me about triumhp that is that swing arm strong and how can it hold up like that. as the wheel is Only mounted from one side .

I told him that every car wheel in the world is mounted single sided and they hold up well. damn I got him :eek:wned:

JakeT.
Excellent point. I'll have to use that in the future when boy-racer wannabe's tell me a SSSA is pointless.
 

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kuhlka said:
Jaket said:
SSSA needs to be heavier to reach the same strengt as DSSA reaches at lower weight. Also SSSA is also more expensive to build.

One guy I know asked me about triumhp that is that swing arm strong and how can it hold up like that. as the wheel is Only mounted from one side .

I told him that every car wheel in the world is mounted single sided and they hold up well. damn I got him :eek:wned:

JakeT.
Excellent point. I'll have to use that in the future when boy-racer wannabe's tell me a SSSA is pointless.
Also ask him why Ducati and other premium sportbikes use them. And BMW. AND certain high performance Hondas.
 

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I think SSSAs have been on various bikes for many years, but SSSAs really saw prominence in the '80s when Honda used it on their Elf endurance racers and RC30. By the '90s, seemed everybody was jumping on the SSSA bandwagon. Fact of the matter is, however, that a conventional, forked, swing arm can be built lighter, stronger and cheaper than a comparable SSSA. This is a big reason why you don't see many SSSAs on non-european bikes. I believe the only middleweight sportbike with an SSSA is the Ducati 848.

I think BMW and Moto Guzzi use the Single-sided swing arm because it works well with their shaft drive, and since these bikes still have center stands, the ease of changing the rear tire is a plus. (there's not a lot of convenience gained with an SSSA when you've got to buy a paddock stand)

I think Triumph, Ducati, and MV Agusta have the SSSA on some models for style more than anything else.

Like Triumph with the Daytona, Ducati dropped the SSSA when they moved from the 998 to 999. It caused such an uproar in the Ducati community that the 1098 has the SSSA. (Its also a big factor in the opinion that the 999 is ugly, while the 998 is pretty)
 

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BillT said:
I think SSSAs have been on various bikes for many years, but SSSAs really saw prominence in the '80s when Honda used it on their Elf endurance racers and RC30. By the '90s, seemed everybody was jumping on the SSSA bandwagon. Fact of the matter is, however, that a conventional, forked, swing arm can be built lighter, stronger and cheaper than a comparable SSSA. This is a big reason why you don't see many SSSAs on non-european bikes. I believe the only middleweight sportbike with an SSSA is the Ducati 848.

I think BMW and Moto Guzzi use the Single-sided swing arm because it works well with their shaft drive, and since these bikes still have center stands, the ease of changing the rear tire is a plus. (there's not a lot of convenience gained with an SSSA when you've got to buy a paddock stand)

I think Triumph, Ducati, and MV Agusta have the SSSA on some models for style more than anything else.

Like Triumph with the Daytona, Ducati dropped the SSSA when they moved from the 998 to 999. It caused such an uproar in the Ducati community that the 1098 has the SSSA. (Its also a big factor in the opinion that the 999 is ugly, while the 998 is pretty)
+1 Supposedly the Ducati marketing department told engineering the 1098 WILL have a SSA or else. Personally, I think the best point of SSA is maintenance. Being able to take the rear wheel off for a tire change with 1 nut is great. And you don't even have to mess with the chain adjustment. BTW, I added the GSG-moto center stand. Should have been standard equipment.
 
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