Triumph Speed Triple Forums banner

1 - 20 of 61 Posts
G

·
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
There is an old rule of thumb that a 10 degree F drop in intake air temperatures will produce 1% more power. It's not exact, but pretty close.

After taking a good look at how (and from where) air is pulled into the airbox, I made a few changes to my 1050 Triple:

The airbox pulls air through two "snorkles" that bend around the front of the airbox. This is blocked by the Secondary Air Injection (SAI) hardware - which was soon removed after using Kuhlka's excellent billet block off plates. Next, the headers were ceramic coated and wrapped with thermal header wrap - in order to keep as much heat IN the exhaust and OUT of the intake and cooling system.

The biggest issue with this is where the air comes from prior to reaching the airbox snorkles. It comes from the backside of the radiator and header - pre-heated before it gets to the airbox. Anything that can be done to allow the engine to pull in air that has NOT been heated by the radiator, oil cooler, and header, will help produce more power. How much power is the question.

I made a simple air dam and ducting that blocks air from the radiator and (hopefully) allows cooler air into the airbox. This dam covers the top of the radiator and encourages air to be pulled from the front sides of the frame. Using 1/8th inch thick PVC sheet, I cut it to match a cardboard template, I used a heat gun to shape the PVC sheet and zip-ties (cable ties) to hold it in place. Thermal shielding is used to keep heat out of the PVC ducting.

The first few rides using the "cold air kit" showed over a 20 degree F drop in intake air temperatures, and a cooler running engine. Throttle response is noticeably improved. Dyno testing and tuning will have to wait two weeks, but ANYTHING that reduces intake air temps helps.

The first photo shows the PVC ducting inside the frame, in front of, and below the airbox snorkles.

The second photo shows the PVC air dam covering the top of the radiator - blocking a good bit of hot air entering the intake.
 
G

·
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
It ain't pretty but is sure seems to work. Light, cheap, and effective. And it follows the K.I.S.S. principal - Keep It Simple, Stupid.

Now to get it on the dyno. If it shows improvement, then someone with 'glass (or carbon) layup experience can build them for the masses. Even vacuum formed plastic would work well.
 
G

·
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Many thanks oh DEVious One. We NEED to get Kuhkla to due it in carbon fiber! Meanwhile i'll follow along ( if I ever get my bike back!!)
 
G

·
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I looked at building a mold for this part in carbon fiber, but it needs to be flexible in order to install it in one piece. A multi piece unit in carbon could be done. I have epoxy and carbon cloth, I may make the final version in vacuum-bagged carbon/epoxy wet layup. I have to do more testing first.

Lots of experience related to boat building - my brother's company - www.rpmpowerboats.com
And I have been racing boats for years, so lots of materials and learning experience. But still not as fine of a finished product as with pre-preg materials and an autoclave, but it works.
 
G

·
Discussion Starter · #13 ·
OK, some interesting results. The areas connecting to the top of the radiator are slightly warping due to heat and wind pressure.The PVC doesn't like heat, but I knew that before starting. It is easy to form and I am going to remake this in a multi piece unit and test a couple of changes I have been thinking about - including replacing the stock "snorkles" on the airbox in order to get air from a better location. In 3 pieces, it should be easy to install, and allow for better shaped ducting.

I also removed it and ran the bike in stock form. It definately does not run as well when removed as with it in place. I need to do more testing and post some intake air temps with and without it in varying weather conditions.
 
G

·
Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Update:
During the server crash the update was lost.

The final design is built in three parts that are riveted together, and fits the frame and under the airbox much better than prior designs. IDue to a shortage of time on my part, I have arranged to have a friend that works at my brother's boat building shop to lay them up in a dual layer of fiberglass. Nothing fancy, but it works and fits well. He is laying up several this week, and I will post pricing and shipping charges in a couple of days - once several parts are ready to be shipped. Pricing will be reasonable.



 
G

·
Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Soon.
I have ordered more rubber trim edging to seal against the airbox for the kits. Several sets of parts are laid up.

A few other projects have priority right now.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,832 Posts
Devious said:
Update:
During the server crash the update was lost.

The final design is built in three parts that are riveted together, and fits the frame and under the airbox much better than prior designs. IDue to a shortage of time on my part, I have arranged to have a friend that works at my brother's boat building shop to lay them up in a dual layer of fiberglass. Nothing fancy, but it works and fits well. He is laying up several this week, and I will post pricing and shipping charges in a couple of days - once several parts are ready to be shipped. Pricing will be reasonable.
Do you have any more information about the pricing? Do you have any pics of the finished product? :) Will this be "limited edition" or will you do more of them if there's demand? :)
 
G

·
Discussion Starter · #20 ·
Premier,
The last two photos are the final version. I will shoot some more photos in a couple of days. The nice thing is that the parts are hardly noticeable on the bike - unless you know what your are looking at.

I am trying to bring the costs as low as possible. Once I get my costs for all of the small parts totaled, I can give a final price. I am targeting USD $60-$75... we'll see.


The ducting consists of two glass parts that fit over the radiator and around the frame to block radiator and header heat. These parts are connected to a third part that fits snugly between the frame tubes (in front of the airbox)and under the airbox.

The airbox for the late model Speed Triples uses rubber intake snorkles that pull air from in front of, and below, the airbox. This ducting makes sure the air entering the air box is pulled from outside the frame. It seals against the bottom of the airbox to prevent heated air from the engine being pulled forward.

If the Secondary Air Injection system parts are still in place, the ducting will not fit. I attempted to make ducting with the SAI in place, but could not get the results (air temps and flow into the airbox) I wanted, so it was scrapped.
 
1 - 20 of 61 Posts
Top