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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I posted this on Rat, but no help.
I went to the dealer today to get my sag adjusted for my weight (170lbs). Well the mechanic adjusted the front preload out to maximum and we were still only getting 27mm sag??? On to the rear preload, ran lock ring up till no threads left and just barely achieved 37mm. I wanted the front to be 25mm and the rear 35-40mm. Does this sound right that the factory springs front and rear would be so stiff for a 170lb. rider. I can tell you that the bike does fill lot less like a brick when I sit on it, I had to leave it at the shop so I have not been able to ride on the street.
 

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I would dearly love to help you, but I just don't have the answer to your question.

Somewhere there is information that states that from out of the crate the Speed Triple is adjusted for a 175 pound rider. This is ridiculous, because the average rider is over 200 pounds. That is, at least the average rider on either Trat or here. Knowing this, I would put the thing back to factory settings and then make small changes until you felt it was handling as you prefer. Of course setting the sag and going from there is the better method.

It might help if you gave a step-by-step of how you are setting your sag. If for some reason you aren't setting your static sag correctly this could make a difference.

Good luck!
 

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Drink more Guinness! :beer: :beer: :beer: :beer: :beer: :beer: :beer: :beer:


There was an article about setting sag posted up on T-rat (http://www.triumphnet.com/st/acc/racetech/setup.htm). In that article, front sag was recommended to be 25-33% of total travel for the street. Since that Showa fork has a travel of 120mm, sag should be 30-40 mm for street riding, 20-30mm for track. Also, according to this article, rear sag should be in the region of 30-35mm.

I think you try it at 27mm front and 35mm rear, and see how you like it.
 
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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Yea, after finding a bunch of info on the net I discovered my mechanic totally screwed up. He never set the static sag 1st. instead he just set the dynamic sag, which should account for both preloads being completely backed out.
 

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Cata,
See if he can give us a good idea of basic set up info. Sag, pre-load, tuning springs, jounce, rebound, etc.
Bike suspension set up seems to be a black art, where as car suspension information is covered in many sources. I generally have someone else set up my bike and make recommendations, but I would love to learn more.
 
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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
speedrox said:
Yea, after finding a bunch of info on the net I discovered my mechanic totally screwed up. He never set the static sag 1st. instead he just set the dynamic sag, which should account for both preloads being completely backed out.
Your mechanic didn't necessarily screw up. Without changing the springs, rider- and riderless-sag cannot be set independently, so if one wants to optimize rider-sag---which, most folks would say, is the more important one to get right---there's no point "setting" rider-less sag. My suspension guru recommends front rider-sag of 35 mm and rear rider-sag of 25-30 mm. When he set mine that way, I noticed a substantial improvement in handling and some improvement in ride quality (which was more attributable to the way he changed the damping settings).

I've since upgraded to a Penske shock and had my forks re-worked, but the above describes my experience with the stock suspension. Moreover, the sag settings are the same . . .
 
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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Now I am really mixed up, I thought it was just the opposite:
Dynamic sag front:25-30mm
Dynamic sag rear:30-35mm
Man I am getting more and more confused :p
 
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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I find the steering both lighter and more neutral with the rear-end riding higher in its travel (with less sag than the front). I have no problem with stability with this chassis attitude.
 
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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
I only know from racing motocross bikes that you set the sag with the rider on the bike. If the bike has to much or to little sag without you on the motorcycle then you will need to change springs. To much sag without rider the springs are to stiff, to little sag they are to soft. I know it sounds backwards but a to soft spring will be maxed out to get proper sag with the rider then wont sag without rider. If the springs are to stiff your weight wont cause it to sag much more than it does without you on it so it will seem to sag more. That should help your confusion.
 

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One additional thing, there is enough sticktion in the suspension that the sag needs to be set by 1) lifting the bike up, let it settle, take a sag reading 2) push the bike down, let it settle, take a sag reading. The right reading is the average of the 2. It takes at a minimum 2 people.
 

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+1
 
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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Thanks for the help, I starting to understand what the mechanic and I have to do for a proper ride.
 

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Is static sag with the bike on sidestand with no weight on suspension?Is dynamic sag with the weight of rider on bike.How do you get starting measurement before you set either sag.Is it with bike on sidestand and take a measurement from a point on swingarm to a point on frame? :popcorn: :wave:
 

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Static sag: Bike under it's own weight, off of the side stand. (Make sure to follow littlefield's advice from the first page)
Dynamic sag: Bike + Rider + riding gear, sitting in riding position. (this is why you need more than one person)

As far as base line measurements, "top out" each end then get a measurement.
 
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