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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've had my used 2011 ABS Speed Triple (in warranty until may 2013) for a little over a month which has been given me start trouble after only the first two days of owning it. Some background on the bike is that previous owner only put 3K miles on it and other then battery tender cables being installed at the dealership the bike is bone stock. I drove the bike from VA to NJ about 300 miles with few pit stops and had no issues. On day two I drove the bike for about an hour, pulled into a gas station to fill up, and then bike would not start (I get a few kicks but engine won't turn over). After multiple failed clutch starts I had to get cables out and get a jump.

For the next month this same problem persists:


(1) Bike is dead when I try to turn on in the morning and has to be jumped,
(2) After an hour of riding, I can just barely get get the engine to turn over on restart
(3) If I power down again I get a few kicks and engine won't start


I've tried the following and the same problem still persists:
(i) Installed both brand new Shorai LC18 and OEM battery and bike has same drain issue (note: Shorai lasted about 1 hour and couldn't power back up at a 90% charge)
(ii) Removed tender cables in case of defective cables
(iii) Checked and tightened cables connected to battery
(iv) Checked and tightened cables connected o stator and starter
note: temperature hasn't gone below 30 degrees here and buddy has same bike as me with not start issues


Videos of issue can be seen at the following:
After 1 hour ride on OEM Battery:
[video=youtube;IhpZwbiBUcI]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IhpZwbiBUcI[/video]

Once hooked up to cables:
[video=youtube;WC9g5R012j0]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WC9g5R012j0[/video]

Same problem with Shorai Installed at 90% charge:
[video=youtube;eboH_05tEHI]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eboH_05tEHI[/video]


This has been the most frustrating issue I have ever dealt with which will undoubtedly leave me stranded every-time I go out. If anyone ha any suggestions or has dealt with a similar issue, PLEASE HELP!
 

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my 06 does the same shit (not as fast) so ill be following this thread hopefully we get an answer!
 

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Trouble shoot the charging system.

stator output

RR ououtput

just use the search function, threads for days on this subject..
 

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my 06 does the same thing... thought I needed a new battery. I can charge the battery, ride all day usually. If the bike sits for too long, i.e. a few hours or overnight, I might need to jump it.
 

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are you guys using the steering lock?
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I cant speak for them but I do...and I make sure parking lights arnt on ;)
Same here and I don't actually use the parking lock that often.

UPDATE:

I just brought the battery into my dealership 20 mins after it wouldn't start the bike and the test showed 12v charge on the battery which should be more than sufficient to power on the bike. They are charging it on some "super" charger for 24 hours, if I have the same problem by Tuesday they going to take more aggressive measures.
 

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Can't you disconnect the negative, put a light tester on the negative and then to the post and see if it lights up? if so you have a short somewhere. Then start popping fuses out til it stops. Then you've isolated which part of the system it's coming from. This was an old trick on a car I used to do awhile back. I would think same applies to the bike.

The dealer super charger thing is BS. That's no different than a new battery or what you've tried IMHO.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I found a great trouble shoot below to test the battery and will trouble shoot once it comes off the charger.

If you have a dead battery and replace it without checking the system vitals, expect it to go dead again. This replacement may get you running again temporarily, but you really need to find out why your other battery died in the first place so you don't end up stuck someplace with a dead bike. Testing a charging system is fairly straightforward. Your battery needs to be fully charged in order to test the charging system. You'll need a multi-meter in order to pin things down. The first thing to check is your DC charging voltage at the battery terminals. Set the meter to 20 volts DC and attach the positive and negative leads to the battery. This will give you your basic battery charge condition. A fully charged battery will have a free voltage reading of 12.6 to 12.8 volts. Start the bike, allow it to warm up and rev it up to 3,000 to 4,000rpms. Look at the DC voltage at the battery. You want to see about 13.5 to 14.5 DC volts when the revs are up. If it's above or below this range, you need to perform further tests. Shut the bike off and hook up the battery charger while you get ready.


If your DC voltage reading at the battery is above the 14.5 volt range, your voltage regulator might be defective. Too much electricity will roast that battery. Replace the regulator/rectifier and retest.

If your DC voltage is below the 13.5 volt range, your stator AC output needs to be tested. Generally, there are 3 wires coming off of the stator that go to the regulator/rectifier. Locate the stator harness (generally coming out of the left side engine cover) and disconnect the harness from the regulator/rectifier. You'll have 3 wires inside the gang connector, A, B and C. Set your multi-meter to 100 volts AC and check the readings between A to B, B to C, and C to A when the bike is revved up to 4,000rpms. Each of these 3 results should be the same, generally in the 50 to 80 volts AC range. If you find one or more winding with a low or zero reading, your stator is burned up and needs to be replaced. This replacement may fix things with no further work, but I have seen defective stators take out regulator/rectifiers because of the erratic voltage outputs. Testing the rectifier calls for an ohm test of the diode bridge to see if there are any bad diodes present. You'll need the service manual for your bike to identify the appropriate wires to test.

A bad stator or regulator/rectifier can also take out a battery. A well maintained battery will typically last about 5 years or so. If the battery is ever discharged or neglected, this lifespan can be shortened by quite a bit.

When all is said and done, a final DC voltage test should be done to verify the repairs were successful and you're good to go. If you're still feeling a little lost, it's best to get help from someone who knows the testing process. This will go a long way to taking the mystery out of charging systems and getting you back on the road.
 

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are you guys using the steering lock?
yeah, but I am super careful about the damn park mode...

I found a great trouble shoot below to test the battery and will trouble shoot once it comes off the charger.

If you have a dead battery and replace it without checking the system vitals, expect it to go dead again. This replacement may get you running again temporarily, but you really need to find out why your other battery died in the first place so you don't end up stuck someplace with a dead bike. Testing a charging system is fairly straightforward. Your battery needs to be fully charged in order to test the charging system. You'll need a multi-meter in order to pin things down. The first thing to check is your DC charging voltage at the battery terminals. Set the meter to 20 volts DC and attach the positive and negative leads to the battery. This will give you your basic battery charge condition. A fully charged battery will have a free voltage reading of 12.6 to 12.8 volts. Start the bike, allow it to warm up and rev it up to 3,000 to 4,000rpms. Look at the DC voltage at the battery. You want to see about 13.5 to 14.5 DC volts when the revs are up. If it's above or below this range, you need to perform further tests. Shut the bike off and hook up the battery charger while you get ready.


If your DC voltage reading at the battery is above the 14.5 volt range, your voltage regulator might be defective. Too much electricity will roast that battery. Replace the regulator/rectifier and retest.

If your DC voltage is below the 13.5 volt range, your stator AC output needs to be tested. Generally, there are 3 wires coming off of the stator that go to the regulator/rectifier. Locate the stator harness (generally coming out of the left side engine cover) and disconnect the harness from the regulator/rectifier. You'll have 3 wires inside the gang connector, A, B and C. Set your multi-meter to 100 volts AC and check the readings between A to B, B to C, and C to A when the bike is revved up to 4,000rpms. Each of these 3 results should be the same, generally in the 50 to 80 volts AC range. If you find one or more winding with a low or zero reading, your stator is burned up and needs to be replaced. This replacement may fix things with no further work, but I have seen defective stators take out regulator/rectifiers because of the erratic voltage outputs. Testing the rectifier calls for an ohm test of the diode bridge to see if there are any bad diodes present. You'll need the service manual for your bike to identify the appropriate wires to test.

A bad stator or regulator/rectifier can also take out a battery. A well maintained battery will typically last about 5 years or so. If the battery is ever discharged or neglected, this lifespan can be shortened by quite a bit.

When all is said and done, a final DC voltage test should be done to verify the repairs were successful and you're good to go. If you're still feeling a little lost, it's best to get help from someone who knows the testing process. This will go a long way to taking the mystery out of charging systems and getting you back on the road.
picking up a multi-meter from Harbor Freight tomorrow and testing my system
 

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Please report voltage across battery terminals while running and while off with ignition on as well as the AC voltage for each of the 3 stator outputs with bike running (should go up around ~70V +/- 15% or so for each terminal when revvd)

Generally, the speed triple needs at least ~12.7V to crank or else it just releases like we see in the vids. At least that's how my '08 works.

My factory battery didnt last long, either. A little neglect & cold weather...
 

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your alternator on your motorcycle is NOT meant to charge a dead battery thats a good way to fry it. it is only meant to maintain the state of charge an provide the power the motorcycle needs to run. just because the battery says it has 12 volts dosent mean it has load holding capacity. you may have a dead cell in the battery an that will cause a lot of your problems.
 

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Think I had a similar issue. I did some research and suspected a bad stator. Yet I wanted to diag the battery first before spending time and money on a stator and possibly a rectifier. So I pulled my battery out of my SV650 and it seems to have resolved the issue. I have not driven the bike for going on two days. I will go downstairs and fire it up... If it starts then I know it was my battery, which does read correct voltage but fails to start my bike after sitting for a day.
 

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A toasted battery is usually a symptom of an unhealthy charging system. Upgrade the R/R, or continue to buy batteries and stators
 

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they are all correct. your charging system can have bad parts that will over charge the batter or not charge it at all. an some can even discharge the batter if it is really bad. if you suspect that this is your problem you can disconnect the battery negative cable an put your meter one the cable an the other end one the bat neg post. put the positive lead in the amp socket an turn it on to millie amp. if it reads more then .040 milli amps you have a problem. start pulling fuses until it drops an if it doesnt disconnect the rectifier an then see. Fixture Gas Auto part Electronic device Machine
 

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So what was the problem? Was it ever corrected by the Dealer or yourself??
Care to follow-up, 5yrs after posting your original problem.

My 2012 seems to have developed the same/similar problem.
I've been waiting 30 days now for the dealership to supply an replacement rectifier. Ridiculous!!!
 

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Probably better off ordering an aftermarket MOSFET r/r and installing it yourself. Not 100% but OEM replacement r/r prolly isn't MOSFET and will still run hot.
 

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Probably better off ordering an aftermarket MOSFET r/r and installing it yourself. Not 100% but OEM replacement r/r prolly isn't MOSFET and will still run hot.
Finally received my replacement RR from the dealer yesterday. It is a FH012AB Part#T1300675.
Unsure if its the same as the original at this moment.


Replacement of the RR is NOT AT ALL straightforward as on the earlier models, or even models without ABS.


Sidenote:
A Service Manual may very well be required,as well as x2 locknuts and new washers for the Brake-line Banjo Bolts.


Maybe a relocation of the RR is in order........
Untill, I unplug the unit,I have no idea as to the length of wiring sub-harnesses I have to work with.I may even need to make a new RR sub-harness to facilitate a more practical location for the unit.
Any idea's as to where the RR would be best relocated to????
 
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