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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
You know how your banjo bolts get all rusty and crappy? Here is a link to a place that sells SS ones that will replace the front and rear brake line bolts. If you have gone to seperate lines in the front, then you can buy 3. They don't have a double one listed yet, so if you have the crossover, you can only replace the left front and rear. Anyway, they are 16 bucks each, but will last a long time.
http://www.thomasnet.com/profile/475782/devine-hydraulics-inc.html Ask for Joe in parts.
 

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Avi8or said:
HEL makes 'em in Titanium....................100% rustproof and half the weight....... :pow:
Ever seen Ti Corrode? It is almost as bad as aluminum. Ti is 60% the weight of steel, and twice the weight of AL.

Chromed Brass works just fine IMHO. But SS would be lighter.


Avi8tor - Where you been?
 

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No, I have never seen Ti corrode.

Titanium Corrosion

Titanium is the fourth most abundant metallic element in the earth's crust. It occurs chiefly as an oxide ore. The commercially important forms are rutile (titanium dioxide) and ilmeite (titanium-iron oxide), the former being richest in titanium content. Metallic titanium was first isolated in impure form in 1887 and with higher purity in 1910. However, it was not until the 1950's that it began to come into use as a structural material. This was initially stimulated by aircraft applications. A modern and comprehensive document on the subject is the second edition of the classic CORROSION BASICS textbook.

Although the aerospace industry still provides the major market, titanium and titanium alloys are finding increasingly widespread use in other industries due to their many desirable properties. Titanium is a unique material, as strong as steel with less than 60% of its density but with excellent corrosion resistance. Traditional applications are in the aerospace and chemical industries. More recently, especially as the cost of titanium has fallen significantly, the alloys are finding greater use in other industry sectors, such as offshore.

Titanium is a very reactive metal that shows remarkable corrosion resistance in oxidizing acid environments by virtue of a passive oxide film. Following its commercial introduction in the 1950's, titanium has become an established corrosion resistant material. In the chemical industry, the grade most used is commercial-purity titanium. Like stainless steels, it is dependent upon an oxide film for its corrosion resistance. Therefore, it performs best in oxidizing media such as hot nitric acid. The oxide film formed on titanium is more protective than that on stainless steel, and it often performs well in media that cause pitting and crevice corrosion in the latter (e.g., seawater, wet chlorine, organic chlorides). While titanium is resistant to these media, it is not immune and can be susceptible to pitting and crevice attack at elevated temperatures. It is, for example, not immune to seawater corrosion if the temperature is greater than about 110oC.
 

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Dr. Gallup,
I can assure you that Ti does indeed corrode when in an electrolytic environment, despite the advice of an aeronautics engineer from Bell/Textron. This was a very expensive learning experience for me when I had some custom parts made to replace Stainless ones. The engineer just said "well, look at that. I've never seen that happen before".

Have you noticed how aluminum and chrome plated bits on the S3 corrode faster than normal? Even on the inside of the headlight buckets - check yours.

Is this simply due to Triumph having shoddy plated and cast/coated parts? Or is this is due to the electrical system of the bike? Maybe both?

On brake parts, I will take SS or chromed brass, and let the racers use Ti.
 

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Devious2xs said:
Avi8tor - Where you been?
and let the racers use Ti
More lurking than posting lately..........and working...........and riding..........and yeah.........I'm a racer..........and I luv TITanium......watch, glasses, necklace...hell even my lighter....now all I need are some TITanium nipples....... :jerkoff: :jerkoff: :jerkoff:

BTW I SEEM to have a 2-3 mpg improvement with the Arrows tune, I'll run a couple more tanks through and if the economy improves then it's dyno time again.
Also the FEW burbles I had on the overrun at about 2000 rpm have gone completely with this tune.
 

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Devious2xs said:
Dr. Gallup,
I can assure you that Ti does indeed corrode when in an electrolytic environment, despite the advice of an aeronautics engineer from Bell/Textron. This was a very expensive learning experience for me when I had some custom parts made to replace Stainless ones. The engineer just said "well, look at that. I've never seen that happen before".

Have you noticed how aluminum and chrome plated bits on the S3 corrode faster than normal? Even on the inside of the headlight buckets - check yours.

Is this simply due to Triumph having shoddy plated and cast/coated parts? Or is this is due to the electrical system of the bike? Maybe both?

On brake parts, I will take SS or chromed brass, and let the racers use Ti.
I can electro plate any metal with the right voltage and electrolyte. But TI is normally very corrosion resistant. I agree with you though, Ti banjo bolts are a waste on money. I can shed far more weight emptying my bladder.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I just put the front SS bolts on, along with the other Galfer line I got from Kuhlka. They use a 12mm socket as opposed to the 14 that rounds off on the oem's. They look clean and shiny! ;D
 
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