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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Tuneboy Tune Edit v3.1.00 instructions:
[For 2005-2006 1050 engines]

• Install software and drivers. Make sure you have the latest version update.
• In Tuneboy file, make a separate file for saving new tunes.
• Download all available tunes for your bike/ECU into this file.

• Connect cable to bike and turn bike key and power switch ON.
• Load Tune Edit and bring up map for correct bike/ECU.

ECU serial number and type (for key):
In Options, under Properties:
Serial Port – Tuneboy Cable (com 7)
Cable type – 2
Tuning link Serial Port – Tuneboy Cable (com 7)
Wait time – 30

Under Tools:
• Select “Get ECU Serial number”
• A window with the serial number should pop up.
• Send this serial number and type to [email protected]

Once you receive the tuning key for your ECU, add it to the correct box under Properties. Additional keys for different bikes can be purchased and added here as well.

Tune Constants:
Under Edit, there is a selection for Tune Constants. Opening this will allow you to alter the wheel speed constant (2566 factory constant) to make the speedometer read more accurately at a given speed.

You can also alter the idle speed rpm. The factory idle is 1300 rpm, but idle speed as low as 1100 rpm have been used effectively. For track days, raising the idle speed as high as 1500 rpm (or even higher) can help with throttle response on low speed turns when you are on and off the throttle.

The Prime Pulse adjusts the amount of fuel added when the bike is first started. This is an additional amount of fuel added to the amount in the look up tables. Adjusting this may help the bike’s initial start up.

Tables:
Each tab on the top of the window selects a table that is made up of cells for each throttle position and rpm point. Together these cells are a map that tells the ECU what to do at a given throttle position and rpm.
Click on a cell to select it, or drag the cursor to select several cells. Use the page up and page down buttons to adjust selected cells.

The main Fuel Trim and Ignition Trim tabs allow you to adjust fuel percentage and ignition timing in 0.1 degree increments in all cylinders.

The AF tab adjusts the target air/fuel ratio for the oxygen sensor. Units below 14.50 will not use the oxygen sensor (in closed loop mode) for correction. Throttle percentage above 6% will not use closed loop mode, instead the ECU uses the fuel tables directly.

F1, F2, F3 tabs allow adjustment of fuel in each cylinder in large or very small amounts. The numbers shown in each cell are time open (flow of air in milligrams). To increase by 1%, multiply the number in the cell by 1.01.

I1, I2, I3 tabs allow adjustment of ignition timing in 0.1 degree increments. On the 1050 Speed Triple and ST the maps are as follows.
I1(N) is ignition map for neutral, I2(G) is ignition map when the bike is in gear, I3 I am not sure when this is used.

On the Rocket III they are 1st, 2nd and 3rd-5th, this is used to restrict power.

L1, L2, L3 tabs allow adjustment of fueling at small throttle positions (6% and below) and are referenced by manifold pressure. The ECU uses these tables at low throttle position for greater accuracy at cruise and idle speeds as well as during deceleration.
 
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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
Tuning info:

Due to the nature of the stock oxygen sensor, or the units on many dynamometers, the engine can rev more quickly than the O2 sensor can respond. This means the air/fuel ratio displayed can be off by up to 1000 rpm – displaying the AFR at a lower rpm than is actually the case.

At different rpm and throttle positions, the cylinders tend to have different abilities to fill the cylinders - mostly due to exhaust pulse wave interaction, but also due to airbox and intake design issues. A different filling ability means different cylinder pressures will be developed.

Also, different cylinders have different abilities to pull heat from the bores and chambers in the block and in the head. Mostly this is due to the circulation of water and oil.

As a result, at a given rpm and throttle position, the cylinders trap different amounts of air, causing different cylinder pressures. Ignition timing is all about cylinder pressure, and making the most of what you have and controlling when it hits peak pressure in relation to the crankshaft's rotation.

If you make peak cylinder pressure when the piston is at Top Dead Center (TDC), the piston, connecting rod, and crank are all vertically aligned. This means the pressure in the chamber cannot be effectively transferred to the crank for rotation and bad things happen quickly. However, if you make peak cylinder pressure when the piston, rod and crank are aligned to best transfer it into rotation, you make more torque and the resulting increased power.

I haven't sat down and figured the geometry out for the 995 and 1050 engines, but generally, somewhere around 20-25 degrees ATDC when the parts are best aligned. The burn rate of the fuel used, the compression ratio, chamber design, etc. all play a part in how and when peak cylinder pressure is made - with other factors as well. But the ignition timing is when the burn starts, and is key in when this pressure is developed in the power cycle.

The down side is that any cylinder pressure in the cylinder prior to the piston reaching its apex in the bore (TDC) robs torque being developed by the other cylinders (a type of pumping loss). So a compromise must be found for best power.

Generally speaking, if you add more ignition advance without detonation, the engine will also want a touch more fuel to make best power. But fuel can also be used to prevent detonation due to its cooling properties.

If you can measure cylinder pressure and detonation in each cylinder, and/or the levels of each major exhaust gas, you can adjust the fueling and timing for each cylinder for best power. Without these measurements, a good knowledge of the engine, tuning, and AFR can get you close on the dyno - with a lot of trial and error.

Once the bike is tuned close to optimum via a target AFR, each rpm point can be bracketed by adding and/or removing fuel to get max power at this rpm point. Then timing can be altered to do the same with small fueling changes to get maximum results.

Another big part of this is preignition and detonation, but that is another complicated subject.
 
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Please feel free to add info and/or correct any info above.

I just hope this helps Tuneboy users and those contemplating a Tuneboy purchase.
 

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You lost me after "Install software..."!! I do appreciate the info and I'm trying like hell to understand it but it's not comin' to me. I'm more visual...if I see it it makes more sense to me.
Fred
 

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what do i adjust the wheel speed constant to so it is accurate?
 

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Best to get hold of a GPS and compare your GPS speed to your speedo reading.
Your speedo normally overreads. Once you figure out it overreads by say 5% then go into the 'Edit' and tune constants.
In the 'wheel speed constant' window, multiply 1.05 by the default figure of 2566 equals 2683 which os the new number you should load into the bike.
Do a recheck with the GPS.
Funnily enough 2683 is the number I put in mine, but I had an old GPS and due lag could not get a very accurate speed. But I'm in the ballpark.
 
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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
The accuracy issue isn't linear. It tends to be off less at low speeds (5%) and off more at higher speeds (a bit over 6%). Use a GPS ang make it accurate at one speed where you drive it most.
 

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Devious said:
Tuneboy Tune Edit v3.1.00 instructions:
[For 2005-2006 1050 engines]

• Load Tune Edit and bring up map for correct bike/ECU.
This was the part that was undocumented. It seems that the manual assumes the user has possibly little knowledge about installing software, but assumes the user knows to open a tune, and the right one at that. Thanks Devious for helping clear things up. Also, the manual said to contact Tuneboy to get the key, which I did, but they replied that I need to get it from where I bought it (newspeed3) which I am currently attempting to do. Can't wait to get it going!
 

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Devious said:
Download the software - it's FREE!

www.tuneboy.com.au
With thoughts of checkin out the software before I purchase in the future...

I d'led the software....Tune-edit won't allow me to open any of the tunes I d'led with it. Tuneboy opens nicely, etc.
(Had to switch to Win 98 compatability mode, otherwise comp. locked up and had to be shutdown via powerswitch)

Searching thru the file directories, it self-installed a "tunes" folder under
C/ProgramFiles/Tuneboy/Tunes

This is where I put the d'led tunes....but it won't open them. I really was just curious and wanted to check things out. I had (erroneously) understood that I could tinker, just couldn't comm. with the bike; with that in mind I used my desktop to give it a trial run. I'm sure that I am just missing something here.............. did I misunderstand?
 

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You are correct, you should be able to do everything but communicate with the bike. I haven't had any problems but I loaded the software off the CD that came with the system. If I'm not connected to anything it always gives me a 'no communication' error on startup but will work anyway.
 
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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
You CANNOT add files to the "Tunes" file in Tuneboy - this is mentioned in the Tuneboy documentation. You must make a seperate file and add the tunes to this file in order to use them.
 

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Gotcha....I was thinking they must have thoughtfully added the "tunes" folder after that was written. Seems odd that they would put that folder in there to me, but I'll give it a go again.
 
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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
I simply made several new folders to keep things organized. One for TB files, one for modified PCIII files, and a third one for my customized tunes that have been dyno tuned.
 

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Me too Cheap,
A great boys and many questions answered.
One more though. Is Mr Tune boy an Aussie?
MH

cheapbastard said:
I wanna tuneboy! :'(
 

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Rule 1: It takes air and fuel to make power.

Rule 2: If you need more fuel, you make more power.
inverse: If you need less fuel, you make less power.

If you modify your correctly tuned engine or add a part that does not require more fuel, it likely will not add more power. The only exceptions are modifications that reduce friction or increase efficiency.
 
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